“The Governess of Highland Hall” by Carrie Turansky

When Julia Foster’s father falls seriously ill, her family must give up their mission work in India to return to England. Now the sole provider for her family, Julia must find work.  The job opportunity is a humbling one working as the new governess for Sir William Ramsey’s family. Recently widowed and discovering the vast debt surrounding his newly acquired inheritance, William is preoccupied to say the least.  Miss Foster dives into the work to tame the youngest children and win the confidence of the older girls.  Julia’s faith, prayers and determined spirit help transform the household.  However, Julia and William are both grieving in their own way with hidden wounds and bittersweet memories, and they are separated by the rigid confines of the early 1900’s English class system.  Will they be able to move on from the past and look forward to the future–together?
 
Carrie Turansky’s new novel is well written.  She allowed me to step into the shoes of the main character–Julia Foster.  I found myself rooting for the new governess when taking on new challenges with kids or other servants, crying with her over the heartache of leaving those she served and loved in India, and groaning over the words left unsaid between her and William. Tuarnsky has a good balance of conversation and narration to keep the pages turning.  I enjoyed the historical context woven into the novel, especially in regards to the strict class system, arranged marriages, coming of age into society, and the visiting American. Turansky writes an enjoyable and endearing novel, even if it is a little predictable.
 
An excerpt of the book can be found at http://waterbrookmultnomah.com/catalog.php?isbn=9781601424969 and “The Governess of Highland Hall” can be purchased at http://www.christianbook.com/the-governess-highland-hall-edwardian-brides/carrie-turansky/9781601424969/pd/424969. I received this book free from Waterbrook Multnomah for my review.
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